Clinical Psychology


WE CAN HELP WITH MANY CHILDHOOD AND ADULT DIFFICULTIES INCLUDING:

Anger
Anxiety
Coping with physical health complications
Depression
Disordered Eating
Family relationships
Feeling lost, sad, and confused without any apparent reason
Grief and loss
Low self-esteem
Parenting
Panic attacks
School attendance difficulties
Pre and postnatal wellbeing
Self-Harm and issues to do with suicide
Trauma


WHAT DO PSYCHOLOGISTS DO?

At 360 MindBody we:

  • Listen attentively and take the time to get to know you.
  • Help you establish a narrative/story of your life’s journey thus far.
  • Assess your struggles, difficulties and strengths.
  • Help you understand the meaning of your distress and not just treat the symptoms.
  • Determine if your difficulties are within the clinical range and if so diagnose a mental health disorder and determine the best treatment.
  • Work collaboratively to identify and prioritize your goals.
  • Develop a treatment plan that is not only supported by current scientific research but also matches your personality.
  • Work with you to achieve insight, acceptance and personal growth.
  • Establish how past experiences can inform your future.
  • Liaise with other supports in your life such as your GP, school, and family.
Contact us
Placeholder
Placeholder

At 360 MindBody we:

  • Listen attentively and take the time to get to know you 
  • Help you establish a narrative/story of your life’s journey thus far
  • Assess your struggles, difficulties and strengths
  • Help you understand the meaning of your distress and not just treat the symptoms
  • Determine if your difficulties are within the clinical range and if so diagnose a mental health disorder and determine the best treatment
  • Work collaboratively to identify and prioritize your goals
  • Develop a treatment plan that is not only supported by current scientific research but also matches your personality
  • Work with you to achieve insight, acceptance and personal growth
  • Establish how past experiences can inform your future
  • Liaise with other supports in your life such as your GP, school, and family.
Contact us

PSYCHOLOGY AND CHILDREN



Children often see psychologists due to a parent, teacher or health professional being concerned about their behavior, social, emotional or neurodevelopment. There may be a change in the child’s behavior or a long-term problem that was previously manageable may be harder to deal with as the child gets older.
Children often communicate using their behavior.
It is only as they mature that they use more language.
A psychology assessment can establish the meaning of a child’s
behavior and what this represents.
A child psychologist can help children 
find the right words to express
their worry or difficulty in place of using regressed or problematic behavior.
Children can learn skills to cope with feeling angry, sad or worried.
Yes, they can. A thorough psychology assessment will be able to establish if this is the case and what the best treatment would be.
We recognize that parents know their children best. They have typically been with their child for all of their child’s life. A psychologist facilitates this relationship by either working together with the parent and child, or with each party separately. Often, parents find it a relief when they come to understand why their child is behaving in a specific way and this allows them to be more patient and attuned to their child’s needs. Many parents find it very helpful understanding their own childhood and experience of being parented with this then informing their own parenting.  
A psychologist can facilitate discussion between all family members. Often each family member has a different perspective on the difficulty and a psychologist can help make sense of what it all means and help find common ground and values.

PSYCHOLOGY AND CHILDREN

Placeholder
Children often see psychologists due to a parent, teacher or health professional being concerned about their behavior, social, emotional or neurodevelopment. There may be a change in the child’s behavior or a long-term problem that was previously manageable may be harder to deal with as the child gets older.
Children often communicate using their behavior. It is only as they mature that they use more language. A psychology assessment can establish the meaning of a child’s behavior and what this represents. A child psychologist can help children
find the right words to express their worry or difficulty in place of using regressed or problematic behavior. Children can learn skills to cope with feeling angry, sad or worried.
Yes, they can. A thorough psychology assessment will be able to establish if this is the case and what the best treatment would be.
We recognize that parents know their children best. They have typically been with their child for all of their child’s life. A psychologist facilitates this relationship by either working together with the parent and child, or with each party separately. Often, parents find it a relief when they come to understand why their child is behaving in a specific way and this allows them to be more patient and attuned to their child’s needs. Many parents find it very helpful understanding their own childhood and experience of being parented with this then informing their own parenting.  
A psychologist can facilitate discussion between all family members. Often each family member has a different perspective on the difficulty and a psychologist can help make sense of what it all means and help find common ground and values.

Teenagers, like children, often see psychologists due to a parent, teacher or health professional being concerned about their behavior, social, emotional or neurodevelopment. Sometimes, teenagers seek help on their own accord.
The teenage years is a period of transition from childhood into adulthood. Teenagers have to manage many competing issues such as peer pressure, social media, and parental expectations all whilst their bodies are full of “raging hormones” and their brains developing. Neuroscience research has found that one of the last connections to be fully established in the brain are in the areas of judgment, problem solving, impulse control and managing emotions.
Yes, some teenagers may struggle more so than others with this phase in their life. They may develop a mental health disorder and cope in maladaptive and dangerous ways.
A psychologist can provide a confidential and neutral space to help teenagers make sense of what is going on in their lives. An assessment can establish why the teenager is acting or behaving in the way that they are and support the teenager develop safer coping strategies. Therapy can also help teenagers identify their own self evaluations, values and priorities separate from external pressures. This often contributes to improved self esteem and confidence.
Parenting a teenager is different from parenting a child. Sometimes parents struggle to make this adjustment and feel overwhelmed by their teenager who has started taking risks, testing limits and asserting their independence. Frequent disagreements between parents and teenagers can lead to a tense and strained relationship. Parents may be unsure about how to set limits and protect their teenager in fear that they may further upset or anger their child. A psychologist can help parents negotiate all these issues in a way that is most appropriate for what the teenager is going through whilst being mindful of the family’s history, culture and values.

PSYCHOLOGY AND TEENAGERS


PSYCHOLOGY AND TEENAGERS

Placeholder
Teenagers, like children, often see psychologists due to a parent, teacher or health professional being concerned about their behavior, social, emotional or neurodevelopment. Sometimes, teenagers seek help on their own accord.
The teenage years is a period of transition from childhood into adulthood. Teenagers have to manage many competing issues such as peer pressure, social media, and parental expectations all whilst their bodies are full of “raging hormones” and their brains developing. Neuroscience research has found that one of the last connections to be fully established in the brain are in the areas of judgment, problem solving, impulse control and managing emotions.
Yes, some teenagers may struggle more so than others with this phase in their life. They may develop a mental health disorder and cope in maladaptive and dangerous ways.
A psychologist can provide a confidential and neutral space to help teenagers make sense of what is going on in their lives. An assessment can establish why the teenager is acting or behaving in the way that they are and support the teenager develop safer coping strategies. Therapy can also help teenagers identify their own self evaluations, values and priorities separate from external pressures. This often contributes to improved self esteem and confidence.
Parenting a teenager is different from parenting a child. Sometimes parents struggle to make this adjustment and feel overwhelmed by their teenager who has started taking risks, testing limits and asserting their independence. Frequent disagreements between parents and teenagers can lead to a tense and strained relationship. Parents may be unsure about how to set limits and protect their teenager in fear that they may further upset or anger their child. A psychologist can help parents negotiate all these issues in a way that is most appropriate for what the teenager is going through whilst being mindful of the family’s history, culture and values.

PSYCHOLOGY AND ADULTS



Adults see a psychologist for a range of reasons. Sometimes there is a clear precipitant, stressful or traumatic life event. Other times it can be a feeling or state of mind that interferes with people’s lives (work, relationships, study), which can be prompts to seek help.
That’s right. Sometimes people talk to a psychologist because they want to prepare themselves for an approaching significant life event (for example marriage, pregnancy, retirement, death anniversary). For other people, there may be a wish for early intervention due to a family history of mental illness. Many people find that seeking help from a psychologist when they are not in crisis presents them with an opportunity to develop a different kind of insight and personal growth.
The above statements are not true! Talking to a psychologist requires a lot of courage. It is not easy for people to admit their insecurities to themselves let alone a stranger! However, in order to achieve a meaningful life that is fulfilling, satisfying and free from pain, people often have to understand thoughts, feelings and experiences that have been confronting and painful.
A clinical psychologist will be able to complete an assessment to establish if the difficulties you are having is best understood as a mental illness or otherwise.
You can see a psychologist with or without a referral from your GP, pediatrician or psychiatrist. If you obtain a referral with a Mental Health Care Plan, then you are entitled to up to 10 sessions in a calendar year with a Medicare rebate. This rebate covers a large portion of the session fees.

PSYCHOLOGY AND ADULTS

Placeholder
Adults see a psychologist for a range of reasons. Sometimes there is a clear precipitant, stressful or traumatic life event. Other times it can be a feeling or state of mind that interferes with people’s lives (work, relationships, study), which can be prompts to seek help.
That’s right. Sometimes people talk to a psychologist because they want to prepare themselves for an approaching significant life event (for example marriage, pregnancy, retirement, death anniversary). For other people, there may be a wish for early intervention due to a family history of mental illness. Many people find that seeking help from a psychologist when they are not in crisis presents them with an opportunity to develop a different kind of insight and personal growth.
The above statements are not true! Talking to a psychologist requires a lot of courage. It is not easy for people to admit their insecurities to themselves let alone a stranger! However, in order to achieve a meaningful life that is fulfilling, satisfying and free from pain, people often have to understand thoughts, feelings and experiences that have been confronting and painful.
A clinical psychologist will be able to complete an assessment to establish if the difficulties you are having is best understood as a mental illness or otherwise.
You can see a psychologist with or without a referral from your GP, pediatrician or psychiatrist. If you obtain a referral with a Mental Health Care Plan, then you are entitled to up to 10 sessions in a calendar year with a Medicare rebate. This rebate covers a large portion of the session fees.
Contact us